FFY 2018, Quarter 1

October 2017 – December 2017

Presented to the State Rehabilitation Council for the Blind

 

Customer Services

Snapshot of Performance Comparison:

Q1 FFY18 VS Q1 FFY17

Increase:

  • New VR Applications [86 vs 63]
  • Hispanic community served [14.3%  vs 12.5%]
  • New VR Plans  [75 vs 65]
  • VR Customers served [1026 vs 942]
  • Average Hourly Wage FFY18 Q1 [21.75 vs 16.97]

Relatively Consistent:

  • Youth/ Transition-age customers served [252 vs 254]
  • New Eligibility Determinations [68 vs 62]
  • Asian community served [6.9%  vs 6.8%]
  • Competitive Employment Outcomes [26 vs 29]

Employment Outcomes:

A sample of successful placements:

  • Mental Health Counselors
  • Office and Administrative Support Workers, All Other
  • Business Operations Specialists, All Other
  • Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software
  • Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School
  • Butchers and Meat Cutters
  • Real Estate Sales Agents
  • Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand
  • Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
  • Education, Training, and Library Workers, All Other
  • Computer Specialists, All Other

Average hourly wage all employment outcomes Q1: $21.76 per hour

Percentage of participants age 55 and older who exited with employment outcome: 19%

  • Eldest: Age 69 (Sales, self-employed)
  • Next eldest: Age 61 (Teacher)

Youth Services 

Spending Targets for Pre-Employment Transition Services Set Aside 

January 2017 thru December 2017

Spending targets for Pre-ETS Services Set-asides
Federal Grant Grant Amount Pre-ETS Set Aside Pre-ETS Spent Dollars Unspent Balance
FY16 VR Award (Use by 9/30/17) 8,730,218.00 1,309,532.70 1,291,505.02 18,027.68
FY17 VR Award (use by 09/30/18)     8,792,634.00 1,318,895.10 189,569.34 1,129,325.76

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Employment Transition Services Activities Since Last SRC Meeting

WorkForce South West Washington Partners in Careers

Partners in Careers (PIC) program pre-employment transition services are being provided for five WSSB juniors and five WSSB seniors:

  • The PIC program provides ongoing weekly soft skills classes where students learn about goal setting, the importance of investing in oneself, jobs vs. careers, leadership, and workplace safety.
  • The students have had opportunity to explore and test the accessibility of the WSW’s new career sector focused website. 
  • On November 9th, five of the PIC program students provided community service for the Fort Vancouver Regional Library System fundraiser/auction with other community volunteers.  The participants greeted event attendees and provided them with information and assistance during and after the auction. 
  • PIC also hosted a mentor workshop on December 10th that nine students participated in.  The students were matched up with mentors, in career fields of their interest, to conduct informational interviews.
  • One of the students began a weekly internship at the Fort Vancouver Regional Library headquarters, working with other volunteers to prepare donated books for sale.  Two other students interviewed at Retail’s Thrift Store and the Pearson Air Museum and will begin their internships in January 2018.  Another student, who has great interest in becoming a professional musician, had the opportunity to job shadow staff at the Clark College Music Department on December 12th.

School day Pre-ets services at WSSB 

  • YSS staff is working with the WSSB GOALS class and with other WSSB students to provide and identify resources for work readiness skills training, complete career interest assessments and guide students in volunteer job placement searches two times per week since October 11, 2017.  The web based Career Cruising platform has been used to facilitate these sessions.

Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL) Conference 

  • The APRIL conference took place from October 20-23, 2017 in Spokane.  YSS staff organized conference participation for five DSB youth.  A WSSB student, who lives in a rural part of Eastern Washington, was one of the youth who had the opportunity to participate in the conference.  The APRIL organization has a strong culture of youth leadership and self-advocacy and the youth who attended had the opportunity to interact with people with a wide range of disabilities.

Career Fair 

  • YSS is on the planning committee for the WSSB Career Fair that is scheduled for March 12-13, 2018.   Planning began at the end of 2017 and the themes “Entrepreneurship: Building a Business” (middle school) and “Putting Your Best Foot Forward” (high school) were selected.
  • Potential activities include job shadow experiences, attendance at the Portland Career Expo, LinkedIn Workshops, presentations by the BEP Program Manager and creation of an appreciation celebration for community support organizations.

Community Engagement 

WorkSource Business Services WIOA Partner Team meeting on October 27, 2017 

  • Participated in the ongoing CCTS/DVR sponsored Transition Learning Community meeting on November 9, 2017
  • Attended TVI round-up meeting in Tumwater on December 5, 2017
  • Met with Clark County Community Services Development Disabilities Program Manager and Program Coordinator on December 14, 2017 to begin discussions about pre-ETS services for youth with multiple disabilities

 “But Where’s the Butter?” Workshop 

  • Eleven students participated in the “But Where’s the Butter” workshop on January 20, 2018. The purpose was to teach students how to make a successful purchase at a grocery store independently using a personal shopper. For this activity, personal shoppers were provided by DSB rather than the store because of the large size of our group. Students learned to use the city bus as part of this experience, including paying their fares with an Orca card and interacting with the bus driver to confirm route number and stops.
  • Once back at the community center, the students worked together to prepare a simple meal. This was a great opportunity for them to socialize and review their experiences. Overall the students expressed that this was a positive experience for them and something new that they had not yet tried.

“Careers with No Fears” Workshops 

  • On-call YSS staff in the Mount Vernon area have planned a series of 6 workshops entitled “Careers with No Fears”. Each month, participants will learn about a selected job/career category and then go on a field trip to interview and job shadow workers at that site. The first workshop, Hospitality and Tourism, took place on January 27th and was attended by seven participants ages 12-17. Upcoming careers to be explored are: Education and Training; Health Sciences; Business Management and Administration; Finance; and Government and Public Administration.

“Can You Imagine?” Workshop 

  • On January 28th DSB hosted a “Can You Imagine” workshop that explored different careers in a setting fit for little ones, with six students participating. The Imagine Children’s Museum in Everett opened their doors early so these kids could have the museum to themselves. They explored areas such as: the farm, the Italian restaurant, a vet clinic, different types of public transportation, etc. At the end of their time, the group went downstairs to learn about solids, liquids and gases. The kids had fun playing with Ooblec and making Gac.

Linked in for Youth  

  • DSB will start offering a Linked-In training for ages 13 to 21, beginning with a workshop in Moses Lake in February and as part of WSSB’s Career Fair in March.  Our contractor was recently approached about offering the curriculum for the Bridge and SWAG students this summer.
  • WDC Partnership: When looking for a place to hold the Linked In for Youth workshop, we discovered that the ESD is very willing to offer their conference room, for FREE, if scheduled in advance.

Edith Bishel Center in Kennewick 

  • The Edith Bishel Executive Director and their board have been working with YSS Supervisor Debbie Brown to develop Pre-ETS workshops for the unmet needs of youth outside of IEP goals.

Regional VR Highlights 

Participant Stories 

Simple Solution with Significant Results 

The Yakima office has a participant who is currently active in skills training in preparation for competitive integrated employment at a local used clothing store. He has cognitive impairments in addition to being totally blind. His work area was challenging to navigate; ROMER Coleman suggested found anti-slip tape, which has a very rough texture, to place on the floor that he could follow for wayfinding. The tape combined with a piece of Velcro on the end of the participant's cane has made it easy for him to notice the rough tape in comparison to the smooth concrete floor. This system has worked great for him and the employer is very happy with it. The tape is sticking well to the floor even after the floor has been swept and mopped repeatedly, and can still be easily removed if necessary.

Saving A Life and A Business 

EO came to DSB as a business owner who was rapidly losing his sight and unsure if he could continue the work that meant so much to him. After assessments were done, his VRC met with EO to determine how he would like to go forward in terms of his business and accommodations. At that time he disclosed that he was considering suicide and that he was not sure if he would sell his business first. The VRC ensured that he was stable, and they discussed the pros and cons of keeping his business. Ultimately, he decided to continue with his work and seems to now have a lot of hope for his life. When he meets with the DSB team now, he smiles. He states that he may retire in the future, but for now he is grateful to be able to keep his shop and indicates that his customers are his family. Without DSB’s help and guidance, it is unlikely that he would still be working.

Growing Business in Moses Lake 

A previous participant, closed successfully by the Spokane office 4 years ago, provided an update regarding her employment. She is still teaching equine massage therapy in Moses Lake. She teaches in a classroom on her property and has expanded to online classes. Her student count has slowly increased, and she is looking at ways to grow her business even more. She is also almost finished with getting approval by the VA to allow veterans to attend her classes with VA funds. She is looking to find the means to purchase an arena so that she can teach with the horses year round. She is very motivated and progressive in her work and it seems to have paid off well for her. She expressed her thanks and appreciation for the help that DSB provided to her years ago to get her started.

No Need to Retire Yet 

JC is a librarian at a state university.  She came to DSB for help because she was struggling at her job and was considering early retirement due to her disabilities.  She had a brain tumor which was mostly removed but caused left ear hearing loss, facial palsy, vertigo, fatigue, & left-sided chronic headaches. She also had strabismus surgery to correct exotropia.  Her visual acuities fluctuate.  With assistance of DSB staff and the accommodations they recommended and provided, she is better able to keep up with her work. She is using all of the tools DSB has given her. She uses ZoomText, and likes her monocular telescope when looking for government publications in the library. JC is extremely thankful for the team at the Yakima office.  Though she still has many medical obstacles to overcome, she has become much more confident in her ability to succeed.

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 1 – DSB Story & Outreach 

  • Youth Services Specialist Janet George recently had the opportunity to talk with a pediatric optometrist about Low vision services in the area. This conversation led to a discussion about DSB and the services the agency provides. Dr. Mann has requested information she can share with her patients about DSB and its services to youth.
  • Spokane VRC Kim Daubl and AT Specialist Sharon Koch met with staff at the Spokane WorkSource office to discuss accessibility, not only to their “hub” computer center but also to classrooms. It was a positive meeting, and it appears that WorkSource is able and willing to make purchases that would provide accommodations for people with visual impairments. They are also interested in brief training in ZoomText. These improvements should make it possible for DSB to finally be able to successfully refer participants to WorkSource.
  • Jonathan Utrera and Laura Ozios-Townsend set up a table at Mt. Tahoma High School’s Pierce County Coalition for DD Resource Fair. This provided a chance do some networking with other community vendors and CRP’s and provide agency information on the services DSB offers.
  • DSB staff and OTC students attended the WCB and NFBW conventions this past Fall to learn, network, and share the DSB story.
  • The Spokane office met with members of the Spokane Tribal VR program in December. Both sides shared more about their programs and discussed ways to collaborate.
  • On November 29, AT Specialist Sharon Koch met with the Whitworth University ESS (DSS) Coordinator, Katie McCray. Whitworth has not had a full-time disabled student services staff member before. Katie would like to increase her knowledge and comfort with vision technology so she was invited to visit DSB for an intro to vision technology.

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 2 – DSB Expertise 

  • On January 8th, North Region had a Government to Government training.  Aimee Gone, Regional Manager from the Office of Indian Policy, came and discussed best practices and cultural sensitivity when working with Native customers.  It was an excellent and informative training.
  • Joanne Laurent, Rehabilitation Teacher in our Vancouver office, spent time with Chuck Frayer, travel consultant with Clark County’s Human Services Council, touring sidewalks, curb cuts and intersections to partner on mobility accessibility issues.
  • Laura Ozios-Townsend (Youth Service Specialist) and John Sheahan (Assistive Technology Specialist) spent time at Olympia High School’s Inclusive Gym Class. These two presented on Blind/VI etiquette, sports and recreation activities. They also demoed an AT application called Seeing AI.
  • Joanne Laurent attended the Accessible Transportation Coalition meeting with the Clark County Human Services Council discussing transportation and mobility accessibility. Discussed project to educate County transportation planners in how their decisions affect mobility and accessibility.

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 3 – Employment at every layer 

  • Ardell Burns attended the Interstate Disability Employment Alliance (IDEA) meeting to debrief regarding the employer event In October, 2017. The group discussed what went well and what could be done differently for the next event. The IDEA group also began planning a participant job fair utilizing the employers who attended the employer event. The group is planning this event for spring. 
  • Jonathan Utrera and Laura Ozios-Townsend participated in the Financial Aid Cohort through PSESD/WDC Youth and Young adult committee to bring awareness of DSB services, professional development and help develop accessible materials for the project.
  • Ardell Burns participated in a meeting with Supported Employment Collaboration with Columbia River Mental Health. Discussion was had regarding wrap around services and provider updates for supported employment.
  • Meredith Hardin spoke at the DVR Supported Employment Summit for WA State Human Resource Professionals. Discussion around educating state HR agencies on hiring supported employment participants who also have vision loss.
  • Ardell Burns shared her ideas at the Clark College Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion meeting. The group discussed paid internship for participants. Ardell provided information about DSB services.

 

Orientation and Training Center Highlights 

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 1 – DSB Story 

Independence. Having It, Keeping It, and Sharing it: Stephanie Mellor’s Story

Steph has always been a very independent person. When her vision began to decline, she decided to attend the OTC to gain the blindness skills and confidence that she would need to maintain her cherished independence.

When Steph was asked to identify her favorite OTC classes, she stated that she enjoyed and found value in each of them.

Home Management had a significant impact on Steph’s life. Prior to taking this class, she had been uncomfortable with cooking meat. She conquered her trepidation and now can prepare well-balanced meals which are essential to helping her maintain a healthy, and busy professional lifestyle. Steph related that she had acquired computer skills prior to attending the OTC, yet her JAWS class at the OTC gave her the techniques that she needed to become an even more efficient user. Those skills have been indispensable in both her graduate school studies and her professional career.

Orientation and Mobility classes at the OTC facilitated Steph’s adjustment to independent travel in a large metropolitan environment.  She learned the King County address system and how to use various types of mass transit. She now travels freely and credits the OTC with the confidence and skills which she now possesses. Steph was able to read braille before attending the OTC, yet again, she chose to sharpen her skills and increase her reading speed. Steph recalled that the Challenge Activities were exciting to participate in, while also giving her the freedom to push herself beyond her normal limits. She recounted that it was “freeing to go for it,” especially if she could compete with experienced instructors such as Jim Portillo and win!

After graduating from the OTC, Steph attended graduate school so that she could become a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor. Steph reported that since she had gained such confidence in her life through the OTC, she was now ready to apply those skills and confidence to graduate school. Nonetheless, Steph still experienced challenges in accessing her course materials. Steph persevered and advocated for herself. She worked diligently because her goal was to assist her blind peers in finding satisfying employment and or school and achieve the goals they have set for themselves.

Steph completed her VRC internship at the Seattle office of the DSB and was offered a full-time position before she graduated. Steph has achieved her long-term goal and is now employed as a full-time VRC in the DSB’s Lacey office. The OTC staff is proud to see Steph accomplish her goals and share her passion for independence with others. Knowing Steph, though, we realize that the story does not end here. We’re certain that Steph already has more long-range goals on her horizon. Go for it, Steph!

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 2 – DSB Expertise 

In keeping with the DSB’s plan to implement the new AWARE Business Management System (BMS), four of the OTC staff have been working with Alliance as Subject Matter Experts. Thus far, they have been exposed to an overview of what the system has to offer, as well as the accessibility training needed to navigate the new system. This will be an ongoing process that will take months. When the training is completed, these employees will help to train other OTC staff in how to efficiently use the BMS.

Progress Towards Strategic Initiative 3 – Employment at every layer 

  • Five Student Training Employment Program (STEP) internships were completed by OTC students this quarter.
  • One student was a music mixing assistant at Jack Straw. Another sorted returned library media at the Washington State Talking Book and Braille Library. Two students interned at the Seattle Lighthouse for the Blind; one was a Human Resources Assistant, while the other wrote social media blogs for the Lighthouse and published them. The fifth student did her long-awaited internship with Seattle Public Schools. She was exposed to all aspects of the SPS Vision Team’s responsibilities.
  • Each student reported that their internships were beneficial. One student noted that she is now aware that she does not wish to pursue the career that she had once dreamed of. The reality of what the position entailed was not clear to her until she had experienced the internship. She has now redirected her goals to reflect her true aspirations.

Business Enterprise Program (BEP) 

BEP Annual Training Conference 

In October, the BEP held its annual two day training conference in Olympia.  Each year the BEP brings in speakers and professionals to address topics of interest to the BEP operators at this conference, and it also serves as an opportunity for operators to stay connected and share best practices. A summary of the training sessions are listed below:

  • Evergreen Vending discussed current vending trends, including the popularity and success of the micro-market system.  This topic of vending trends is pertinent to the operators not only because the vending in public buildings finances the BEP but also it is an opportunity for the operators to learn of trending items they may want to sell in their own facilities.  The speaker also encouraged the operators to get involved in lobby days at the State Capitol.
  • An UberEats Account Representative spoke to the group about their model and how BEP operators might be able to take advantage of it.  One operator had already been using UberEats and was able to share his experience to date.  Coincidentally, the Washington Hospitality Association mentioned third party delivery models similar to UberEats in their separate presentation to the group.
  • Sysco Foods graciously shared resources for the training conference in the form of their Corporate Executive Chef.  He discussed some current food trends and discussed perceived menu value.  According to the Chef, four out of five people are willing to spend more money on food if they think it is of a high quality. 
  • The Washington Hospitality Association (WHA) came to Friday afternoon’s session with four representatives.  They discussed and answered questions about upcoming sick leave laws, paid family leave, hiring and retaining employees, and working with millennials, among other things.  The operators asked about rest area commercialization, and in a follow up the WHA suggested educating the House Transportation Committee so they will have an idea of the issue if the topic comes up for a vote.  Rest Area Commercialization has become a big topic for BEP this year because the President’s proposed budget mentions infrastructure funding will be primarily at the State level and could be funded through tolling and private/public partnerships.  Year over year, vending at highway rest areas represents about 23% of the BEP’s operating budget.  With private/public partnerships at rest areas, this piece of funding could be lost.  Similar to Evergreen Vending, the WHA encouraged operators to attend their sponsored lobby day: Hill Climb and Taste Our Best Legislative Reception.

Independent Living Blind Skills Services 

Client Services Service Snapshot –Younger Blind (YB) and Older Blind (OB) Clients

Trend

Total

YB

OB

Total Cases

644

64
(10% of all clients)

580
(90% of all clients)

Service Delivery to Hispanic or Latino Clients

19

8

11

Service Delivery to Asian Clients

21

1

20

Centenarians (age 100 or older) Served

11

0

11

Youth (24 or younger) Served

2

2

0

Homeless Clients (all clients 60 years old or younger)

4

3

1

Clients with Depression

122

14

108

Clients with Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders (includes Parkinson’s, arthritis, and osteoporosis)

*More OB Clients have some sort of bone, muscle, skin, joint, and movement issue than any other medical issue.

247

19

228

Clients with Diabetes

*More YB Clients have diabetes than any other additional medical issue.

154

20

134

Average Cost per Client

-

$532

$459

Outreach 

On November 15, 2017, Sophia Leduck gave a presentation to the DSHS office in Aberdeen. Eight social workers or other professionals were in attendance. The presentation included a demonstration of low vision and other adaptive devices and a discussion regarding our services and training offered.

Recent Satisfaction Survey Comments 

  • “I only found out about the services from a blind lady on the paratransit bus.  Wish I knew sooner…”
  • “Doug is very knowledgeable and taught me things to help get me out of the house and to be more confident out in public places”
  • “Magnifiers increased my ability to see things. The book program is lovely. Sheila is wonderful!”
  • "As I fill out this form I am listening to my beloved cassette player. I am impressed by cassette tapes. Sophia personally showed me various "tricks" and equipment I had no knowledge of. She answered many questions I didn't know I had.” 
  • “Margie Corier was a perfect representative for this program.  She was sincere in her desire to help and certainly understanding about the problems of being legally blind.  Thanks to her and their program.” 
  • “Kate was my expert contact that visited me from Sight Connection.  New understanding and help was excellent!”

Financial Report 

Federal Fiscal Year Q1 2018, Through December 2017

2018 State Fiscal Year Review as of Dec. 31, 2017 (in thousands)

Source

Allotment

Expenditures

Balance

General Fund – State

2,478

468

2,010

General Fund – Federal

12,454

5,732

6,722

Information Tech. Investment Fund

508

265

243

BEP and Local

30

10

20

Total

15,470

6,475

8,995

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018 State Fiscal Year – Federal Grant Funds Only as of December 31, 2017 (in thousands)

Grant

Award

Prior Expenditures

FFY17 Expenditures

Balance

2016 Voc Rehab Basic Services

8,732

8,149

565

18

2017 Voc Rehab Basic Services (balance is Pre-ETS set aside)

8,793

5,307

2,560

926

2018 Voc Rehab Basic Services

9,171

0

2,225

6,948

2017 Supported Employment

61

6

5

50

2018 Supported Employment

61

0

7

54

2017 Independent Living

0

0

0

0

2018 Independent Living

0

0

0

0

2017 IL Older Blind

668

518

131

19

2018 IL Older Blind

668

0

0

668

Total

28,154

13,980

5,493

8,683

  1. $62,004 in state expenditures went against the 2017 IL grant and $20,096 against the 2018 IL grant.  Federal grant dollars are not yet expended as DVR received the full grant award for grant years 2017 and 2018.  A meeting is pending regarding how to expend and draw down DSB 16% of the IL grant dollars. 
  2. The grant amounts for 2018 are an estimate.

 

 

 

 

 

2018 State Fiscal Year – Total Expenditures by Program as of December 31 (in thousands)

Program

Grant Funds

State

Other

Total

Voc Rehab Basic Services

5,350

436

367

6,153

Supported Employment

12

1

0

13

Independent Living

0

3

0

3

IL Older Blind

131

93

0

224

Birth Through 8
(Not Grant Funded)

0

0

10

10

Social Security Revenue

0

0

240

*240

Business Enterprise Program

0

0

339

339

Business Management System

0

265

0

265

State Only

0

48

0

48

Total

5,493

846

956

7,295

*The $240,000 in Social Security Revenue was used towards VR services.

 

 

What’s Happening in World of DSB Business and Finance? 

  • The Governor, as part of this 2018 supplemental budget, proposed $187,000 be restored to the Agency’s budget.  These funds relate to an estate donated to the agency.  The Governor’s proposed budget is now in the hands of the legislature.

  • The Agency’s 15% set aside for Pre-Employment Transition Services was nearly all expended for the 2016 grant period.  Of our $1.3 million set aside, we only returned $18,000.  For FFY 2017 the set aside requirement is approximately $1.3 million and to date we have expended $190,000.  

  • Funding for the adult population is being monitored closely to ensure sufficient funds are available to serve all individuals applying for services.
  • The BMS project is underway and very exciting.  Approved and included in the 17-19 budget is $3.2 million in state dollars for this project.  To date, and shown above, the Agency has expended $265.   This project will continue through at least April 2019 but no later than June 2019.

 

Agency Communications Report

Progress towards Strategic Initiative #1 – DSB Story

  • PSA Day – free production by TC Media in Olympia

  • Publications
    • American Job Center branding added to new documents as per WIOA standards
    • YSS flyers promoting 6 events
    • YES Brochure Updates
    • 2017 Outcomes Poster created and distributed to all offices

Other Communication Happenings since last SRC meeting

Website 

  • Updates of note
    • Added nearly 80 pages of WACs to the website
    • Updates to SRCB section per meeting with K. Canaan
  • Google Analytics Last Quarter (10/01/17 – 12/31/17)
    • Users: 4,275
    • Page Views: 13,330
    • Channels: Direct, 1,851 (43%) Search, 1,984 (46%); Social 303 (7%); Referral, 189 (4%)
  • Updated Online forms now live
    • Self-referrals: 66
    • Physician referrals: 7

Social Media

Agency following on social media sites is growing organically.

  • Facebook

    • Likes: 83 (+52)
    • Total Followers: 91 (+47)
    • Total Reach: 9,323 unique users (+4,585)
  • LinkedIn
    • Total Followers: 53 (+5)
    • Unique Impressions: 172 (-47)

Events/Meetings/Trainings

  • Communications Directors Meeting, January 24

Legislative Liaison

The 2018 Regular Legislative Session convened on January 8, 2018. The session is scheduled to end on March 8, 2018.
  • Thirty-five bills included on agency Bill Tracking Report
    • 19 bills introduced by the House
    • 16 bills introduced by the Senate
  • February 6, 2018 was the last day to pass bills out of committee and read them into the record on the floor) from House fiscal committees and Senate Ways & Means and Transportation committees in house of origin.
As of February 8, all tracked bills are still moving through the legislative process.
 

Human Resources Update

New Hires

Personnel

Job Title

Team

Duty Station

Effective Date

Debbie Brown

PS 5, Youth Services Program Specialist/Supervisor

CS/Admin

  All Regions

12/01/2017

Young Choi

BMS Project Lead Tester/ITS5 (Project)

BS/IT

  Lacey

12/18/2017

Brandon Shotwell

BMS System Configuration Spec/ITS1

BS/IT

  Lacey

12/18/2017

Laura Ozios-Townsend

Information Technology Specialist 3/AT

CS/South Region

  Tacoma

01/02/2018

Tamas Geczy

Information Technology Specialist 3/AT

CS/North Region

  Seattle

01/08/2018

Departures, Resignations, and Retirements

Personnel

Job Title

Team

Duty Station

Effective Date

Sue Porter

Information Technology Specialist 3/AT

CS/North Region

  Seattle

01/09/2018

 

 

 

 

Current and Future Openings

Personnel

Job Title

Team

Duty Station

Effective Date

Recruiting

Program Specialist 3, Youth Services Program Specialist

CS/South Region

  Lacey

01/17/2018

Recruiting

Rehab Teacher 3/O & M

CS/North Region

Seattle

01/23/2018

Vacant

Chief Financial Officer

Business Services

Lacey

  TBA